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» Online Classroom   »   » Public Discussion of Inland and Coastal Navigation   » First three chapters

   
Author Topic: First three chapters
Lee


 - posted January 31, 2007 08:06 AM      Profile for Lee           Edit/Delete Post 
Greetings:
Recently received materials for the home study coastal nav and am impressed with the depth and clarity of the content. Not being a left-brainer, it may take me longer than most to do the work but I'll give it my best. Just finished the first three chapters and have a couple of questions.

(1) Can you point me to the text that defines an "inshore zone"? Don't recall that.

(2) In question 1-1, can you show me how you got 185.2?

(3) Question 1-18 has me stumped. I don't think I understand it. If the obscured area is on the eastern half of the compass (050/146) and Trial Is. is to the SW, are we saying that we are looking at the BACK of the light, and that's why it's obscured? Also,

(4) I re-read 2.8 and 2.9 but could find no reference to "miles per handwidth." Finally,

(5) do we really need to buy annual editions of Coast Pilot, Light List, Tide Tables, and Tidal Current Tables? That's a few bucks. Thanks for your help, and your efforts to make this course as comprehensive as it is.

From: Cocoa FL
David Burch


 - posted February 12, 2007 12:24 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Question (1)

Inshore zone is in the glossary. it is also defined in the text on page 10-5 related to the rules of the road... also see section 10.8 on special terms from the Nav Rules.

Please let us know where this has come up in the early part of the text and we will see that the cross reference is clearer.

Also, and likely the best answer, is if you do a search on "inshore zone" in this general discussion locker you will find a link to discussion of inshore zone which answers the question as well.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted February 12, 2007 12:55 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Question (2).

The official definition of a nautical mile is 1852 meters, exactly. Thus one tenth is 185.2

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted February 12, 2007 01:01 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Question (3)

If you do a search on "1-18" you get a discussion of this problem. Please check to see if that answers your question.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted February 12, 2007 01:07 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Question (4)

...refers to problem no 1-19, which has to do with a trick on interpreting chart scales. This trick is discussed in third paragraph of chapter 2. There the word handpan is used and not handwidth, so we should have been a bit more tidy with the language. We have added an errata comment on this in the tech support.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted February 12, 2007 01:17 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Question (5)

The short answer is No. All of these publications except the tide and current tables are online and can be downloaded. Also there are publications of annual updtates to the coast pilot, which will more than do the job.

Light List and tide and current data can be looked up online for individual charts or for specific dates.

I would buy one coast pilot and one light list and then print out the updates for the coast pilot every once in a while, but these are not often crucial to small craft mariners.

for the light list updates, you need them for each trip into new areas where you might depend on aids to navigation.

tides and currents can be downloaded for specific reggions as needed or there are excellent (free) software packages that do the job worldwide (see resouces section) and there are even more convenient commercail versions such as Tides and Currents for Windows.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA


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