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» Online Classroom   » Marine Weather   » Public Discussion of Marine Weather   » WX0303-0016 

   
Author Topic: WX0303-0016 
mnally55


 - posted May 01, 2020 12:26 PM      Profile for mnally55           Edit/Delete Post 
Question 16 asking of gulf current off shore of west palm beach could be answered using general/text book info, but using practical application of your teaching and resources available, NWS reported west wall between 10 and 13 miles off shore currently.
David Burch


 - posted May 01, 2020 03:38 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
It is not just our word on this, but rather the sources we provide, namely the coast pilot as well as actual data.

You can see measured currents close in shore at this link

https://cordc.ucsd.edu/projects/mapping/maps/fullpage.php?

but you have to set the data back to last year, as live data seems to be offline as the universities closed.

Data shown in the pic is from the NCOM model, which is best for this region. The more popular global RTOFS does not have the resolution to get in this close.

The thick green line is the west wall in the OPC 24h wind and waves at https://ocean.weather.gov/shtml/A_24hrww.gif

Usually this is pinned right against the coast from central FL south.


From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted May 01, 2020 03:47 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Scale too small to read anything but we see it is close even in this pic from the OPC wind and wave 24h forecast.




From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted May 01, 2020 03:57 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
This is the Navy GS map from today, same as the OPC map time above, and indeed this is the source of the OPC data.

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/jag/navy/data/satellite_analysis/gsscofa.gif?id=69280

On this blow up the distance between inside of black line and outside of coast zone is ~5 nmi. But we see the color of the GS waters right up to the coast.

Top gray parallel is 29N; bottom is 23N

In short, this is hard to see without the real measurements in place, but we can believe the Coast Pilot.

All these current resources are at www.starpath.com/currents


From: Starpath, Seattle, WA


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