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» Online Classroom   » Emergency Navigation   » Public Discussion of Emergency Navigation   » Photographic lunar

   
Author Topic: Photographic lunar
David Burch


 - posted October 31, 2006 07:56 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 





Celestial Navigation Data for 2006 Mar 19 at 5:38:23 UT

For Assumed Position: Latitude N 27 12.2
Longitude W 80 13.4

Almanac Data | Altitude Corrections
Object GHA Dec Hc Zn | Refr SD PA Sum
o ' o ' o ' o | ' ' ' '
MOON 39 00.5 S19 55.0 +28 14.9 135.3 | -1.9 15.3 49.3 62.6
JUPITER 34 46.8 S16 05.9 +28 12.9 129.0 | -1.8 0.3 0.0 -1.5
SATURN 134 03.1 N19 49.0 +40 27.1 273.6 | -1.2 0.2 0.0 -1.0
ALIOTH 67 38.5 N55 55.4 +59 53.0 14.1 | -0.6 0.0 0.0 -0.6
ALKAID 54 16.4 N49 16.7 +60 15.0 35.1 | -0.6 0.0 0.0 -0.6
ALPHARD 119 15.1 S 8 41.2 +37 52.5 232.1 | -1.3 0.0 0.0 -1.3
ALPHECCA 27 29.2 N26 41.3 +43 21.1 77.9 | -1.1 0.0 0.0 -1.1

Moon phase is waning gibbous, 84% illuminated




From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted October 31, 2006 08:27 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
here is the picture of moon and jupiter as indicated. Then we have drawn in some circles and lines to try to estimate the distance between them all scaled to the diameter of the moon.

 -

The moon diameter is 205 pixels, the line jupiter to moon inside edge is diagonal of a rectangle of sides 2157 and 216 which is 2167.8 then divide by 205 to get 10.57 diameters, and from data above 1 diameter is 30.6' so separation is 5° 23.5'.

We will come back later and analyze this lunar distance sight to see how well we did... or you can go ahead yourself. time and location are in the data note above.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted October 31, 2006 08:56 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
here is a first pass at the lunar distance analysis. If you do not have a starpilot program, you can do this online with the FER site, and you get these results:

 -

this shows that this site could have told us our longitude to within about 53', which is not too bad for starters. may be pure luck, or maybe we can do better. this was a quick crude analysis. we will post the origianl pic below so you can do it yourself to see what you get.

the lunar distance site is at http://www.historicalatlas.com/lunars. It is the fine work of Frank Reed, present coordinator of the NavL discussion group.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
David Burch


 - posted October 31, 2006 09:04 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
Here is a link to the original hi-res picture from Steve Miller. You can download this and analyze it yourself to see how well this procedure might work.

03192006_Jup-Moon_0038.jpg

We have several more of these hi-res photos of moon + body taken at a precise time and from a precisely known position, and as time permits we will try some more. all photos taken by one of our online celestial nav instructors, Capt. Steve Miller.

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA


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