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» Online Classroom   » Navigation Rules   » Public Discussion of the Nav Rules   » Marina: Rules-of-the-Road

   
Author Topic: Marina: Rules-of-the-Road
Cbeim


 - posted July 08, 2020 11:20 AM      Profile for Cbeim           Edit/Delete Post 
I have been researching how the Rules-of-the-Road apply in a marina, however, I have found several different answers. Can you provide me with some guidance?

This topic is in reference to all marina vessels being power vessels.

Applying the approach that the vessel with the most maneuverability in the marina is the Give-Way, makes sense. A smaller boat would Give-Way to a larger vessel.

If there is a current outside of the marina, such as a marina entrance connecting to a river, then the inbound traffic (approaching from the river into the marina), would be the Stand-On, and outbound vessels (from the marina entering the river) would be the Give-Way.

However, I have also heard that while in the marina (not necessarily at the intersection of the marina and a river), that outbound traffic would be the Stand-On, and inbound traffic would be the Give-Way, in order to avoid congestion with vessels “stacking up” in the fairways like a crowded highway.

At some marinas I have seen signs stating outbound traffic is Stand-On, while in other places inbound is Stand-On. What about the marinas where this is not stated?

Within a marina, there can be several fairways which have intersections with other fairways. I have been told that in these situations (regarding similar vessels with the same maneuverability) that the vessel to the starboard side is the Stand-On (which would be the same as power boats crossing in open water).

However, I have also heard that a vessel in the main fairway leading in/out of the marina is the Stand-On, while a vessel on a side fairway (not the main fairway), is the Give-Way. This approach would be to avoid congestion in the main fairway.

Likewise a vessel exiting the main fairway, and going into a side fairway would be Stand-On, and a vessel in the side fairway would be Give-Way, in order to avoid congestion in the main fairway. However, this could cause congestion in the side fairway, which oftentimes is more narrow than the main fairway.

Applying the principle to keep a slow speed, be courteous, and avoid other traffic in the marina, works well. However, is there a source for more definitive guidance?

David Burch


 - posted July 08, 2020 01:49 PM      Profile for David Burch           Edit/Delete Post 
I have been researching how the Rules-of-the-Road apply in a marina, however, I have found several different answers. Can you provide me with some guidance?

====
the key is always the Navigation Rules, and in this regard, we note Rule 1 on Application

(b) Nothing in these Rules shall interfere with the operation of special rules made by an appropriate authority for roadsteads, harbors, rivers, lakes, or inland waterways connected with the high seas and navigable by seagoing vessels. Such special rules shall conform as closely as possible to these Rules.

In short, nations can make rules that override the international rules (we do that, so does canada), and states can make rules, counties can make rules (lake rules are often county rules) cities can make rules, and marinas and yacht clubs can make rules.

We have a convenient copy of the Navigation Rules online to use for such studies because all related docs are on the same page and can be searched at once. See https://www.starpath.com/navrules/NavigationRulesHandbook.html You cam usually find these in google searching on starpath pocket navigaiton rules
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This topic is in reference to all marina vessels being power vessels.

====
rowing, paddling, and sailing vessels also can operate in most marinas
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Applying the approach that the vessel with the most maneuverability in the marina is the Give-Way, makes sense. A smaller boat would Give-Way to a larger vessel.

====
Vessel size is not a factor in the Navigation Rules, although we are instructed in Rule 6(a),iii on choosing our own Safe Speed to take into account "The manageability of the vessel with special reference to stopping distance and turning ability in the prevailing conditions.

=====

If there is a current outside of the marina, such as a marina entrance connecting to a river, then the inbound traffic (approaching from the river into the marina), would be the Stand-On, and outbound vessels (from the marina entering the river) would be the Give-Way.

====
In the river itself, there are rules on this, but it would be up to the marina or other agency to say how this applies in the marina.
============

However, I have also heard that while in the marina (not necessarily at the intersection of the marina and a river), that outbound traffic would be the Stand-On, and inbound traffic would be the Give-Way, in order to avoid congestion with vessels “stacking up” in the fairways like a crowded highway.

At some marinas I have seen signs stating outbound traffic is Stand-On, while in other places inbound is Stand-On. What about the marinas where this is not stated?

Within a marina, there can be several fairways which have intersections with other fairways. I have been told that in these situations (regarding similar vessels with the same maneuverability) that the vessel to the starboard side is the Stand-On (which would be the same as power boats crossing in open water).

However, I have also heard that a vessel in the main fairway leading in/out of the marina is the Stand-On, while a vessel on a side fairway (not the main fairway), is the Give-Way. This approach would be to avoid congestion in the main fairway.

Likewise a vessel exiting the main fairway, and going into a side fairway would be Stand-On, and a vessel in the side fairway would be Give-Way, in order to avoid congestion in the main fairway. However, this could cause congestion in the side fairway, which oftentimes is more narrow than the main fairway.

===
As noted, marinas may have rules of their own, but for the most part these are not needed as they are covered by the Navigation Rules themselves, and it would be hard to imagine a case where obeying the navigation rules would lead you contrary to some local rules.

=====

Applying the principle to keep a slow speed, be courteous, and avoid other traffic in the marina, works well. However, is there a source for more definitive guidance?

=====
Yes there is and again it is Nav Rules themselves. That is the definitive guide... and indeed we must be careful with any other guidelines. Good manners on the water means obeying the Rules. Giving way when you are the stand on vessel is not good manners. It is wrong and dangerous. It is far more important to study and know the rules and obey them than to be just say i will avoid all traffic and give way to all. With that said, anywhere near a dock, the old saying "slow is pro" is usually right!

Our local large marina at Shilshole Bay has no custom navigation rules. They tell me that if someone is sailing in the marina and causing risk to others, they will tell them that it is not legal to sail in the marina, but this is not in fact written anywhere. And it does not need to be because it is illegal in the those circumstances based on the Navigation rules alone. Sailing into dock without causing trouble is not an issue.... other than the risk of embarrassment if done wrong.

All times are Pacific

From: Starpath, Seattle, WA
Cbeim


 - posted July 09, 2020 06:21 AM      Profile for Cbeim           Edit/Delete Post 
Thank you.


All times are Pacific  
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